Recommended Read: The New Preschool Is Crushing Kids (The Atlantic)

The New Preschool Is Crushing Kids

Today’s young children are working more, but they’re learning less.

By Erika Christakis - Jan/Feb 2016 Issue

Step into an American preschool classroom today and you are likely to be bombarded with what we educators call a print-rich environment, every surface festooned with alphabet charts, bar graphs, word walls, instructional posters, classroom rules, calendars, schedules, and motivational platitudes—few of which a 4-year-old can “decode,” the contemporary word for what used to be known as reading.

Because so few adults can remember the pertinent details of their own preschool or kindergarten years, it can be hard to appreciate just how much the early-education landscape has been transformed over the past two decades. The changes are not restricted to the confusing pastiche on classroom walls. Pedagogy and curricula have changed too, most recently in response to the Common Core State Standards Initiative’s kindergarten guidelines. Much greater portions of the day are now spent on what’s called “seat work” (a term that probably doesn’t need any exposition) and a form of tightly scripted teaching known as direct instruction, formerly used mainly in the older grades, in which a teacher carefully controls the content and pacing of what a child is supposed to learn.

Read the full article at The Atlantic here.

* This is another post in the POTA Recommended Read Series. We'd love to hear your comments, feel free to add your thoughts, questions or musings in the comments section below. Do you have an article you think would be of interest to our parents? Share it with us at info@nycpreschool.org